The Money Game

Adam Smith or George J. W. Goodman

Publisher: Vintage, 1976, 253 pages

ISBN: 0-394-72103-9

Last modified: May 21, 2007, 2:33 a.m.

The name of the Game is Money. It was Lord Keynes who first saw that the handling of it is a Game. And it is 'Adam Smith's' contention that all the books on money speak only of economics and statistics — and they're only half the Game. This book is about how the Money Game is played and how the players really behave.

  1. You: Identity · Anxiety · Money
    1. Why Did the Master Say "Game"?
    2. Mister Johnson's reading List
      "… the dominant note of our time is unreality:"
    3. Can Ink Blots Tell You Whether You Are the Type Who Will Make a Lot of Money in the Market?
    4. Is the Market Really a Crowd?
    5. You Mean That's What Money Really Is?
    6. What Are They in It For?
      1. Cuddling Comsat
      2. I Want to Be Loved for Myself
      3. Was I Dumb! Was I Dumb! Kick Me!
      4. IBM as Religion: Don't Touch, Don't Touch
      5. The Broker as Witch-Doctor
      6. Can I Tell Rosalind? Can I Tell Harriet?
      7. They Make Me Do Everything Wrong
    7. Identity and Anxiety
    8. Where the Money Is
    9. Mr. Smith Admits His Biases
  2. Systems
    1. Can Footprints Predict the Future?
    2. What the Hell Is a Random Walk?
    3. Computers and Computeers
    4. But What Do the Numbers Mean?
    5. Why Are the Little People Always Wrong?
  3. They: The Pros
    1. The Cult of Performance
    2. Lunch at Scardale Fats'
    3. Losers and Winners: Poor Grenville, Charley, and the Kids
    4. Timing and a Diversion: The Cocoa Game
  4. Visions of the Apocalypse: Can It All Come Tumbling Down?
    1. My Friend the Gnome of Zurich says a Major Money Crisis Is On Its Way
    2. If All the Half Dollars Have Disappeared, Is Something Sinister Gaining on Us?
  5. Visions of the Millenium: Do You Really Want to Be Rich?
    1. The Purposive Investor

Reviews

The Money Game

Reviewed by Roland Buresund

Decent ****** (6 out of 10)

Last modified: May 21, 2007, 2:51 a.m.

A book written in the sixties, that just as well could have been written today (except for a few details).

This is proof that most investment bankers and fund managers are complete morons, especially in the light that they haven't changed in over 40 years (same mistakes and bad attitudes year after year).

This should be mandatory reading for anyone considering a glamorous career involving trading or any type of exchange. If you are not into these kinds of fun, avoid it, as it probably will be very boring without some knowledge of how these market works.

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